Outstanding Care · Home Instead Recruitment
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Outstanding Care

All care services in the Uk are audited by a regulatory body.  In England this is the Care Quality Commision (CQC), in Wales the The Care and Social Services Inspectorate Wales (CSSIW), in Scotland The Care Inspectorate and The Regulation and Quality Improvement Authority (RQIA) in Northern Ireland. 

In January 2015 the Home Instead office in West Lancashire and Chorley became one of the first three companies to be awarded an Outstanding rating. 

This rating highlighted our emphasis on compassion, respect and dignity, as well as our flexibility and responsiveness to people's changing needs.

CQC report

In its report CQC identified the following as key strengths

  • Staff demonstrated a good understanding of people's needs and how to support their safety and wellbeing.
  • The minimum care visit was for one hour, allowing staff to spend time with people in their care, build up a relationship and fully understand the things that were important to them.
  • Our inspectors saw effective processes to ensure that any concerns about a person using the service were recorded, so that their wellbeing could be monitored.
  • Ongoing training was tailored to individual members of staff and their particular development needs, and there was a robust induction programme.
  • The service found innovative ways of supporting important areas of wellbeing – such as introducing a weekly menu planner for people who needed support at mealtimes.
  • Care planning addressed social and emotional needs as well as health and physical ones – for example identifying the risk of isolation or the loss of independence.
  • Managers had developed a positive culture based on strong values, which they promoted through training, supervision and strong leadership.

Home Instead also won praise for its strong links in the local community. One initiative the report highlights is the registered manager's delivery of dementia awareness training to the public – including bank and shop staff – to help them understand how to help people with dementia that they come into contact with.

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Above and beyond

"What was particularly striking about Home Instead Senior Care was the outstanding feedback we got from people who used the service and community professionals," says inspector Marie Cordingley. "We heard so many examples from them explaining how the service had 'gone the extra mile' or 'above and beyond'. They had really succeeded in translating their strong values into practice and that resulted in the sort of care we would all want for our loved ones."

Click here to go to the CQC website

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Children's author and creative maestro Celia Jenkins loves her role caring for older people. The 29-year-old CAREGiver from Corsham, near Bath, says the role slots perfectly into her busy life which includes writing travel books and stories for children, as well as poetry. Celia’s skills also span into knitting – something which goes down particularly well with the elderly clients she cares for – and she has published a collection of knitting patterns for beginners.

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